Campaign aims to influence children (and their parents) away from negative stereotypes


pledgeme-and-webaddressYou know how kids stare at people in wheelchairs and aren’t sure what to say? Well, we want to change that. We want kids to run up to people in wheelchairs and say, “Wow! You must be a superhero!” 

My Friend is a Superhero! is a children’s book about Jack, who uses a wheelchair, told by his friend, who sees all the amazing things Jack can do — like  getting to school sitting down, playing basketball and doing tricks at the skate park. Jack’s also really good at maths!

Written by Barbara Pike and Philip Patston, and illustrated by Sam Orchard, the book’s purpose is to influence children (and their parents) away from negative stereotypes, as well as portraying unique aspects of function and experience to encourage children’s natural curiosity.

The book is A5, 32-pages and full colour. Reading age is around 7-9 years, but we believe it would suit children aged 3-10 years and possibly older as a discussion starter about diversity. It is published by Diversityworks Trust Inc.

A PledgeMe campaign aims to raise money to print 1000 copies of My Friend Is A SuperheroDuffy Books in Homes have agreed to distribute 500 of these to lower-decile schools throughout New Zealand.

Duffy Books in Homes provides free books to children from decile one, two and three schools. Children in these schools are more likely to come from homes which have limited or no access to books. Children who can’t read become adults who can’t communicate and that’s a serious disadvantage in a world that operates on the written word.

Duffy provides free books to over 100,000 New Zealand children, three times a year, across 500 schools. This includes books for school libraries as well as copies that kids can take home and keep.

The rest of the books will be available as rewards and for sale. Any profit from sales will go towards a further reprint of the book.

PLEDGE TODAY!

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