Making a Difference? Get funded!


Think Differently is a social change campaign to encourage and support a fundamental shift in attitudes and behaviour towards disabled people. It’s about focusing on what people can do rather than what they can’t. Think Differently is doing this through work with disabled people’s organisations, and linking up with employers, educators, businesses, families, whanau, and…

When hiring, consider diversity in the widest sense


FOXBusiness writes: In the workplace the concept of diversity is usually defined by race, color, religion, sex or national origin, with disability sometimes overlooked as a component of a diverse workforce. While disabled people make up 20.1% of the labor force, according to the Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, the unemployment rate for…

Promoting positive attitudes and behaviours towards disabled people


The Government has invested $3 million dollars over three years for a campaign to improve attitudes and behaviours towards disabled people. The Think Differently campaign will fund community-driven social change, strengthen existing initiatives and support new approaches to changing attitudes. Support will be provided through national strategic partnership with organisations and the Making a Difference fund for…

From sympathy to empathy – understanding disability


by Philip Patston. In her book “I Thought It Was Just Me (but it isn’t): Telling the Truth About Perfectionism, Inadequacy, and Power”,  TEDster Brene Brown explores the causes and connections between shame, courage, empathy and compassion. One of the sub-themes Brown talks about is the difference between empathy (understanding) and sympathy (pity). Instantly I got thinking about…

Tattooing and social change


by Philip Patston. Sometimes change is just about getting out there and doing things other people wouldn’t expect you to do. It’s about sharing yourself openly, unashamedly and generously with people who may not usually come across someone like you. In my case, getting my first tattoo was an act of social change. I had…