WheelAir®, the cushion that cools all manual wheelchairs


The WheelAir® is the world’s first cooling wheelchair backrest cushion to cool all manual wheelchairs. It is ergonomically designed to provide more support, whilst the unique fan technology gently blows cool air onto the user’s back, instantly enhancing their comfort and taking away any excess heat and moisture.

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Magdalena Truchan sits in a wheelchair. She has blonde hair and wears a checked hat, colourful jacket and bright red knee-high boots, which match her lipstick . Her legs are crosed.

Clothing industry’s narrow focus sidelines people with disabilities


Source: HowStufWorks The fashion industry has some catching up to do when it comes to considering people with disabilities. That’s according to the results of a recent study, which surveyed 113 people with mobility impairments. The findings showed that about half of the respondents were unable to attend events like weddings, school dances and job…

A Clever Shock-Absorbing Bike Wheel, Now for Wheelchairs


Source: Wired.com Entrepreneurs love to  claim they’re “reinventing the wheel.” So what do you say when you’ve actuallyreinvented the wheel? “I love spokes, I’ve just come up with something different,” explains Sam Pearce, a British designer who, if you haven’t guessed already, created a spoke-less, shock-absorbing wheel that’s being used on wheelchairs and bicycles. Loopwheels,…

Temple Grandin

Temple Grandin: The world needs all kinds of minds


Temple Grandin, diagnosed with autism as a child, talks about how her mind works — sharing her ability to “think in pictures,” which helps her solve problems that neurotypical brains might miss. She makes the case that the world needs people on the autism spectrum: visual thinkers, pattern thinkers, verbal thinkers, and all kinds of smart geeky kids.

Neil Harbisson

Neil Harbisson: I listen to colour


Artist Neil Harbisson was born completely color blind, but these days a device attached to his head turns color into audible frequencies. Instead of seeing a world in grayscale, Harbisson can hear a symphony of color — and yes, even listen to faces and paintings.