A Clever Shock-Absorbing Bike Wheel, Now for Wheelchairs


Source: Wired.com Entrepreneurs love to  claim they’re “reinventing the wheel.” So what do you say when you’ve actuallyreinvented the wheel? “I love spokes, I’ve just come up with something different,” explains Sam Pearce, a British designer who, if you haven’t guessed already, created a spoke-less, shock-absorbing wheel that’s being used on wheelchairs and bicycles. Loopwheels,…

Temple Grandin

Temple Grandin: The world needs all kinds of minds


Temple Grandin, diagnosed with autism as a child, talks about how her mind works — sharing her ability to “think in pictures,” which helps her solve problems that neurotypical brains might miss. She makes the case that the world needs people on the autism spectrum: visual thinkers, pattern thinkers, verbal thinkers, and all kinds of smart geeky kids.

Neil Harbisson

Neil Harbisson: I listen to colour


Artist Neil Harbisson was born completely color blind, but these days a device attached to his head turns color into audible frequencies. Instead of seeing a world in grayscale, Harbisson can hear a symphony of color — and yes, even listen to faces and paintings.

Amputee holds orange in prosthetic hand

More access-improving technology


“The researchers at the École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EFPL) in Switzerland and the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna (SSSA) recently developed a completely new sensory feedback channel which allowed a Danish 36 year-old amputee, Dennis Aabo Sørensen, to feel objects in his hand in real time. This was the first time in nine years that Sørensen experienced the sensation of touch.”…

Why would CP stop a dedicated video creator?


In this slightly emotive article, geek-zine Engadget profiles the work and study of Christopher Hill who uses a single switch to control a rather elaborate Mac-based editing suite. Despite the dodgy language and tone, it’s a great testament to the power of technology with a nice reveal at the end. Read the article and watch…